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Emerald, Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, 2(11), p. 112-121

DOI: 10.1108/jmhtep-04-2015-0015

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Workforce development in dementia care through education and training: an audit of two counties

Journal article published in 2016 by Andrea Mayrhofer, Claire Goodman ORCID
This paper is available in a repository.
This paper is available in a repository.

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Abstract

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice following peer review. Subject to 12 months embargo period, embargo end date: 16 May 2017. The version of record, Andrea Mayrhofer , Claire Goodman , (2016) "Workforce development in dementia care through education and training: an audit of two counties", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 11(2): 112 - 121, is available on line at doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-04-2015-0015 ; Abstract Purpose ??? People with dementia require care at home, in care homes and in hospitals, which has implications for the current and future workforce in health and social care. To inform regional workforce development planning in dementia care, Health Education East of England commissioned an organisational audit of current dementia training at NHS Trusts and in social care across Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach ??? Qualitative methods and non-probability purposive sampling were used for recruitment and data collection. The audit included NHS Trusts, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, and health and social care organisations involved in commissioning and providing dementia education and training in the two counties. Findings ??? Whilst there was considerable investment in dementia awareness training, learning was not targeted, assessed or structured to ensure on-going professional development. Practical implications ??? This has implications for workforce development and career-progression for staff responsible for the care of older people with dementia. Conclusion: if a future workforce is expected to lead, coordinate, support and provide dementia care across health and social care, a qualifying curriculum could play a critical part in ensuring quality and consistency of approach and provision. Originality/value ??? This paper makes a timely contribution to discussions on the skills and competencies needed to equip the future workforce for dementia care across health and social care. Keywords Education, Workforce development, Training, Ageing societies, Dementia care Paper type Research paper